In the Trenches: Tale of Two Johns

By JOSH BOARD
Autograph April 2010
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Character Actors: Ronny Cox

By SCOTT VOISIN
Featured in Autograph May 2009

Ronny Cox as Luke in The Car.

Ronny Cox might just be the most recognized actor in Hollywood… kind of. “Throughout my career, I’ve almost never been recognized as an actor,” he says. “People just think they know me. Someone will come up to me and say, ‘Aren’t you from Des Moines, Iowa?’ I’ll say, ‘No, I’m an actor,’ and they’ll say, ‘I’ve never seen you in the movies but there’s a guy that looks exactly like you in Des Moines.’ I’ve literally had that conversation a thousand times. It turns out there’s a guy that looks exactly like me in practically every town!”

Cox made his acting debut alongside Burt Reynolds and Jon Voight in the 1972 box-office hit Deliverance. Years of steady work followed, and in 1984, he appeared in his first blockbuster, Beverly Hills Cop, playing a by-the-book California police lieutenant who squares off against Eddie Murphy’s free-wheeling Detroit detective. “What was interesting about Beverly Hills Cop is that the big set-piece for my character at the end of the film was my first day of shooting,” Cox remembers. “As an actor, I had to be fully aware of the relationship Eddie and I had gone through; how we started as adversaries and went through this and this, even though we hadn’t filmed any of it yet. To get ready to do the last scene on my very first day took a tremendous amount of homework.”

Cox as Chief Andrew Bogomil in Beverly Hills Cop II.

After Cop’s huge success, Cox was approached to do the sequel. “I don’t like sequels much to begin with, and I had reservations about it,” he admits. “I ended up doing Cop II because my character was sort of the reason for the story, but I had some problems with it. Cop I was good for me; Cop II was not so good. The stuff they offered me in Cop III was dreadful, so I turned that down.”

Fifteen years after Deliverance, Cox had made a living playing loving husbands and dedicated cops. In 1987, audiences finally got to see his dark side in RoboCop. “In many ways, RoboCop was as big a breakthrough for my career as Deliverance was because, for the first time, I got to play a bad guy,” he says. “I always think the bad guys are far and away the most interesting. Playing a good guy is pretty boring, and every decision he makes is absolutely predictable. I liken it to painting… If you’re the good guy, you get three colors: red, white and blue. But if you’re the bad guy, you get the whole palette. RoboCop was a huge boon to my career because after that, I was offered all kinds of roles.”

He took advantage of the opportunities, appearing in more than 100 movies and TV shows, but for the last several years, Cox has spent less time in front of the cameras and more time in the recording studio. With six CDs under his belt, he enjoys creating music and performing for an audience. “I love acting, but I don’t love it as much as I love the music,” he explains. “With acting, there’s that imaginary fourth wall between you and the audience. With music, there’s the possibility of a profound, one-on-one sharing that takes place, especially with the kind of music I do. I tell stories… You get the set-up, you get the story and then you get the payoff in the song. Wherever I play, I like to have the house lights up because I want to be able to see the audience and connect with them.”

Cox-signed magazine cover.

At this point in his life, Cox is still willing to play the Hollywood game, but only on his terms. “Acting is not the be-all and end-all for me that it is for a lot of other people,” he says. “I’ll go play music at the drop of a hat, but to get me in a movie or television show, it has to be something I really want to do. If I have music dates during the shooting schedule, I tell them to make room for those dates or else I won’t do the movie. That’s a hard concept for them to understand in Hollywood, but that’s how I feel about it.”

Autograph dropped a line to Ronny Cox and he responded, “I’m always grateful to the fans and appreciate their enthusiasm. It’s always amazing to me that even though I play villains and bad guys, the fans seem to separate those characters from my music. I have found the Stargate SG 1 fans to be some of the most ardent of my music fans. Go Figure!”

Metallica Autographs

By STEVE GRAD
Autograph May 2009
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How to Buy Rock…Without Getting Rolled

By STEVE CYRKIN
Autograph February 2009
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In the Trenches: Spektor Strike-Out

By JOSH BOARD

Featured in Autograph January 2010

The author (left) with Mandy Patinkin

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