What Whitney Houston’s Last Autographs Reveal

By Kathi McKnight,
Master Certified Expert Handwriting Analyst

Whitney Houston signing her last documented autograph, Thursday, Feb. 9, 2012.

 

Whitney Houston

Raw Talent, Big Presence, Troubled Handwriting

The music world and fans were stunned and saddened by the sudden death on February 11 of Whitney Houston .

Despite tumultuous public battles with addictions and substance abuse, she will be remembered most of all for her legendary, extraordinary voice. But while her voice expressed the heavenly gift deep in her soul, her handwriting reveals the demons she struggled with.

Join me now in taking an exclusive look at what was going on deep inside this beloved Pop Diva’s soul in the final hours of her life, via the insights her very own handwriting reveals.

Whitney Houston February 9, 2012

Two days before her unexpected death, TMZ and paparazzi captured Whitney signing her last two documented autographs. Disheveled looking, she wasn’t the Whitney we were used to seeing.

 

Whitney's Houston's first album, and one of the last two she signed.

Whitney's first album, and one of the last two she signed.

One autograph she signed was on her first album, “Whitney Houston,” a top seller. The cover shows Whitney looking sleek and divine like the goddess of pop music that she was.

But her handwriting…was a mess. You don’t have to be a certified graphologist to see the writing on the wall.

Were there any clues in those final autographs to give a warning that she had just given her last performance? Revealing that for Whitney Houston, the final curtain had just come down?

It had been so many years since Whitney included a smiley face in her autographs, yet on this night, where her final performance was captured at the Tru Nightclub in Hollywood, she signed her autographs with a smiley face superimposed over her signature.

She wanted the world to see her as happy, like in the old days. Tangled and illegible her autograph reveals much more than meets the eye.

Come with me for an insider’s look.
I’ll teach you how to read between the lines.

Our signature, autograph, our John Hancock—whatever you want to call it—is our personal logo. It is the public profile we want the world to see.

While it must be noted that no one can be fully known or analyzed by just their signature alone, and that full handwriting samples are strongly recommended for a full analysis, do not dismiss the power a signature carries.

The signature is just the tip of the iceberg, and what does show up, can carry 3-5 times the weight of importance compared to the rest of one’s handwriting.

Think of it this way:  What if those on the Titanic had paid attention to the tip of the iceberg? Would the fate of those on board have turned out differently?

 

Signatures: When they are legible the writer is willing to let you see him or her. They are interested in communicating.

When the signature is illegible (as many super stars’ are) it means they only will let you in so far to see them. And they don’t really want you to know who they are. You are not invited in past a certain point. It also means they may have found a fast way to sign their name if they have to sign their name a LOT.

Many celebrities and “regular folk” too, sign their name with the first letter much larger than the rest of the writing; especially if they tend to be successful in business. This is commonly known to reveal a writer who has a “healthy ego” and it is generally accepted. Most people realize it takes a strong sense of self to be successful in the world at large.

Keep in mind, there are no mistakes in handwriting.

Handwriting does not lie.

 

There are over 5,000 things that handwriting reveals about the person being analyzed, and only about things that it doesn’t:

  • It does not predict the future.
  • It does not tell the age of the signer.
  • It does not tell the gender.
  • And it does not tell if the signer is right handed or left handed.

(The last one surprises everyone!)

What we look at as a professional graphologist are the upper loops, the lower loops, the size, the pressure, where the t’s are dotted, where the i’s are crossed, if the writing is rounded or pointed, the slant, where it is placed on the page and soooo much more.

Then…we stack all of these things together!

Whitney Houston's last autograph on a 12-inch single.

Looking at Whitney’s final autographs above, if you didn’t see the picture or know it was her name ahead of time, would you be able to read this signature?

No.

Me neither.

I’m a handwriting analyst, not a mind reader.

Do you see the check-mark far above the letter i? That is her i dot and it reveals annoyance and irritation. Yet she is putting on a happy face (or so she thinks) with a very sloppy attempt at superimposing a smiley face. She had been drinking when she autographed these pictures. Even still, she wrote uphill which usually means optimism. She was feeling high and having a good time. Some say when writing is slanted so epically up hill, the writer is trying hard to deny and overcome depression.

Notice the height of the letters in these two autographs. I’m not talking just about the first letter of her name. I’m referring to any and all letter that naturally go into the upper zone, in this case the “h” and “t”. When letters reaching into the upper zone are more than 3 times the height of the middle zone, it is an indicator of vanity.

No big deal you say? After all, if anyone had reason to be vain, it would be Whitney Houston. Gorgeous, rich, beloved, talented beyond reason, all true.

Michael Jackson had the trait of vanity in his autographs and hand-writings too.

In an interview with Oprah Winfrey, Houston shared her feelings about performing with Michael Jackson at his 30th-anniversary special in 2001 saying it opened her eyes, that she saw him as a “mirror” because he reflected her own issues with addictions. “I just remember doing the anniversary special and I remember looking at Michael and I remember looking at myself and I was getting scared looking at him,” she said. “I was looking at myself. I don’t want it to be like this. Mike and I were very close.”

While there are quite a few other factors found in these autographs, look at the height of some of the letters in “Whitney.” They are disproportionately tall compared to the other letters. You could go mountain climbing over those tall letters.

In handwriting analysis when a person unconsciously writes strokes and letters that are disproportionally tall in their height compared to the rest of the writing (specifically compared to the middle zone letters) it is a clear indicator of vanity.

And this seems to be the crux of her demise. It is one of the more unfortunate and potent traits that were setting her up for a fall.

When vanity is discovered in handwriting, it reveals a writer who prefers high achievement to emotional satisfaction. There is arrogance and a dogmatic approach to living life. The writer has intense pride in herself and what she has achieved. But here is the kicker:

Rejection can cause acute anxiety to
the person with vanity in their writing.

This trait of vanity as it is discovered in handwriting means the writer is enslaved to adoration, constant praise and attention. They are the most susceptible to flattery out of all the other traits found in handwriting.

In my new book,  What the Final Autographs of Whitney Houston Reveal: Sizzling Secrets in her Script, I trace Whitney’s handwriting from the early days in the 1980s-90s when her career was at its peak…clear up to the bitter end. Her autographs over the years reveal an autobiography rich in surprises and the pivotal moments are revealed when she could have gone one way or the other.

There was a time when she seemed to have an angel on one shoulder and the Devil on the other.

However the trait of vanity was always present, even in the early days, back in 1990’s, when she autographed this picture. This woman with the voice of an angel was battling many demons.

Whitney Houston back in the 1990s.

You could practically read the autograph back then, but sadly the writing reveals a strong indicator of self doubt as is evidenced by the ending stroke of the letter y moving up, over and to the left as she uses that stroke to cross her letter t. It also serves as a protective bubble over her name. This and more uncovers her feelings of self protectiveness, self doubt and much more.

Pride that accompanies vanity makes it difficult to admit the need for anyone else, even God himself. Pride feeds the illusion that we are completely independent and self-sufficient. Whitney never fully “got” it. “A vital part of overcoming alcohol addiction drug abuse, codependency or baggage from the past that may make you susceptible to a lifestyle of pain and suffering is finding spirituality in recovery (beliefs), or a strength greater than yourself.” “The more faith you put in the spiritual relationship and the more you trust the guidance without using human logic, the greater will be the results in your life.” Spirituality in Addiction Rehabilitation

It’s ironic. The song she sang so passionately held the answers all along.

But a beat was skipped and now the curtain has gone down for the final time.

 

Greatest Love of All

I believe the children are our future
Teach them well and let them lead the way
Show them all the beauty they possess inside
Give them a sense of pride to make it easier
Let the children’s laughter remind us how we used to be

Everybody’s searching for a hero
People need someone to look up to
I never found anyone who fulfilled my needs
A lonely place to be
So I learned to depend on me

[Chorus:]
I decided long ago, never to walk in anyone’s shadows
If I fail, if I succeed
At least I’ll live as I believe
No matter what they take from me
They can’t take away my dignity
Because the greatest love of all
Is happening to me
I found the greatest love of all
Inside of me
The greatest love of all
Is easy to achieve
Learning to love yourself
It is the greatest love of all

I believe the children are our future
Teach them well and let them lead the way
Show them all the beauty they possess inside
Give them a sense of pride to make it easier

Let the children’s laughter remind us how we used to be

[Chorus]

And if, by chance, that special place
That you’ve been dreaming of
Leads you to a lonely place
Find your strength in love

___________________________________________________

RIP

Whitney Houston

Kathi McKnight is a master certified expert handwriting analyst, motivational speaker and author. For more information and to sign up for free weekly tips about 7 Little Known Handwriting Analysis Secrets, visit her website at TheHandwritingExpert.com  or KathiMcKnight.com.

Watch for Kathi’s new book, “What Whitney Houston’s Final Autographs Reveal: The Sizzling Secrets in her Script” to get an exclusive look at her autographs with in-depth analyses of each and every one. Bonus: “Handwriting samples of Michael Jackson”, and many more. Available at Amazon and Barnes and Noble by March 15 or sooner!

America’s Most Historic Signed Beatles Album Being Auctioned October 1

“To ‘Doc Gordon’ Thanks for the Jabs” from George Harrison 

Band-Signed “Meet the Beatles” Thanks Doctor Who
Treated Harrison Before Beatles U.S. Debut on Ed Sullivan.

George inscribed the album, “To ‘Doc Gordon’ Thanks for the Jabs … From George Harrison.” John, Paul and Ringo also signed.

Hidden away in a stack of records for 47 years, the Beatles album marking the most important event in rock and roll history is being auctioned October 1.

The “Meet the Beatles” album was signed by John, Paul, George and Ringo, with a special inscription added by George, the day before America met the Beatles on the “The Ed Sullivan Show,” February 9, 1964.

George’s inscription was a thank you to Dr. Jules Gordon, the house physician at The Plaza Hotel. Dr. Gordon treated Harrison’s 104-degree fever and raw throat that threatened to keep him from joining the Beatles for their historic Sunday American debut. George was so ill that Beatles’ manager Neil Aspinall had to stand in for him for most of Saturday’s rehearsals.

Beatles’ manager Neil Aspinall fills in for a sick George Harrison during Saturday rehearsals for the “Ed Sullivan Show.”

But Dr. Gordon’s shots and vaporizer treatments started working and George was able to join rehearsals later in the day. George’s sister, Louise, was charged with watching over him until the doctor came back Sunday to check on his recovery.

Knowing how excited his sons would be that he treated one of the Beatles, Dr. Gordon sent someone to get an album, hoping “the Boys” would sign it before he left Saturday.  The Beatles were happy to oblige, with an especially grateful George writing:

To “Doc Gordon” Thanks for the Jabs … From George Harrison.

The reverse of Dr. Gordon’s signed and inscribed “Meet the Beatles” album.

Authenticated by Frank Caiazzo, the world’s most respected Beatles autograph authenticator, it is the only personalized album known that was signed by all four Beatles while they were in New York for the “Ed Sullivan Show.”

While as many as seven “Meet the Beatles” are known to have been signed during this time, this is the only album that clearly commemorates the Beatles’ first American performance—and Dr. Gordon’s pivotal role.

Front cover of Dr. Gordon’s “Meet the Beatles” album.

Their appearance on Ed Sullivan was more than the Beatles’ American debut. It launched The British Invasion, which brought a flood of British bands to America, including the groundbreaking likes of The Rolling Stones,  The Yardbirds and The Moody Blues. These top British artists inspired American musicians, much like Elvis, Buddy Holly and Chuck Berry had inspired the British Rockers in the 1950s. Their combined influences changed the sound of rock and roll music forever, making it the dominant music worldwide to this day. 

Will it Break $100,000.00 on October 1?

Letter of Authentication by Frank Caiazzo, widely recognized as the world’s top Beatles autograph authenticator.

This is only the 15th band-signed U.S. release Beatles album known to exist—and seven of them are “Meet the Beatles.” Dr. Gordon’s family consigned the album to Case Antiques for their October 1 auction, and while their estimate is $40,000 to $45,000, it could bring $100,000-plus. U.S. release Beatles albums generally sell for about $100,000 or more, and the importance of this personalized album means it will likely sell for a substantial premium—whether at the auction or later if the successful bidder offers it for sale.

Dr. Gordon’s family offered the other “Meet the Beatles” they had in Case’s Spring auction last May. That one, which Dr. Gordon had signed for one of his sons but was not inscribed or personalized, sold for $63,250 and is now being offered by the buyer at $125,000. Case is primarily an art and antique auction house, and many Beatles collectors didn’t now the album was being sold. So while it went for a good price, it didn’t bring as much as it likely would have at one of the traditional autograph auction houses.

That’s not likely to happen this time.

Auction Listing:

Lot 566: Signed Meet The Beatles Album, “Thanks for jabs”

The second of two “Meet the Beatles” albums, autographed by all four band members, from the estate of Dr. Jules Gordon and his direct heirs. Update – On 9/16/2011, Frank Caiazzo, world recognized Beatles autograph expert, inspected this album and verified its authenticity. A document of authenticity from Frank Caiazzo is included in the photographs and will be provided to the winning bidder in addition to an affidavit of authentication from the descendant. The first completely autographed “Meet the Beatles” album from the Gordon family sold in our May 22nd, 2011 auction (lot #281). This is the last remaining album from the Gordon family and is personally inscribed to Dr. Gordon by George Harrison. The inscription reads “To “Doc Gordon” thanks for the JABS from George Harrison” along with the signatures of John Lennon, Paul McCartney, and Ringo Starr. Original album and album cover. 12-1/4? H x 12-1/4? W. This signed album was given to Dr. Gordon, who treated George Harrison for a sore throat the day before the Beatles American television debut on the Ed Sullivan Show. Thomas Buckley noted in the New York Times on Feb. 8, 1964: “Mr. Harrison, who is known as the quiet Beatle, awoke yesterday with a sore throat. He was treated by Dr. Jules Gordon, used a vaporizer and rejoined his colleagues at the studio late in the afternoon. ‘I should be perfect for tomorrow,’ he said.” According to George Harrison’s sister, Louise Caldwell, Harrison’s health was more serious than reported. In “The Beatles Off The Record” by Keith Badman, Caldwell recalled: “The doctor said he couldn’t do the Ed Sullivan Show because he had a temperature of 104. But they pumped him with everything. He was thinking about getting a nurse to administer the medicine, every hour on the hour. Then the doctor suddenly realized that I was there and was his sister and he said to me, ‘Would you see to it? It’s probably just as well that you’re here because I don’t think there’s a single female in the city that isn’t crazy about the Beatles! You’re probably the only one who could function around him normally.’” Dr. Jules Gordon of New York City was the house doctor at the Plaza Hotel from 1942 until 1985. This album, given to one of his direct heirs in 1964, has been with the family ever since and has never before been offered for sale. Condition: Slight overall toning to cover. Wear to upper spine. Some scratching to the album itself.

For more information, go to www.caseantiques.com, email Case Antiques at info@caseantiques.com or call them at 865-558-3033.

 

PSA and PSA/DNA Opening New Jersey Office

(Woodbridge, New Jersey) — To meet the increasing needs of collectors and dealers in the eastern U.S., especially in autographs, Professional Sports Authenticator and PSA/DNA Authentication Services are opening an office in Woodbridge, N.J., this summer.

Only in-person submissions will be accepted at the new office, by appointment. All mailed and shipped submissions should still be sent to PSA and PSA/DNA’s Calif. office unless pre-approved by the staff.

“We’re very excited about the New Jersey office,” said Joe Orlando, President of PSA and PSA/DNA. “It is near I-95 and centrally located between New York City and Philadelphia. Considering the concentrated customer base on the upper east coast, and the growing popularity of PSA/DNA-certified autographs, the time is right to provide an additional location for our customers.”

Orlando said the new office will improve turnaround times on many submissions.

“We’ve had three consecutive record quarters for PSA/DNA, and some members of our staff have been traveling over 100,000 miles each year to service our customers. A few of our California employees will be relocating to the New Jersey office, and we’ll be hiring additional employees. By being able to process autographs on both coasts more efficiently, our turnaround times will naturally improve.”
Only autographs will be processed in New Jersey, but, the new office will accept all other submissions, including trading cards, tickets, photographs, sports memorabilia and game-used items for evaluation by PSA and PSA/DNA authenticators and graders in California and elsewhere.

“We’ll be able to encapsulate authenticated items in the New Jersey office, such as autographed cuts and autographed cards,” Orlando said. “It also will be easier and more convenient for eastern U.S. collectors and dealers to submit larger items, such as autographed bats and helmets, without mailing them.”

The New Jersey office will host open submission days, similar to PSA Fridays in Calif., where the public can personally submit items and meet PSA and PSA/DNA staff members.

“People have been asking me for several years, ‘When are you going to open an east coast office?'” Orlando said. “The answer is this summer, and we’ll have additional information about it in the weeks ahead with a formal announcement at the National Sports Collectibles Convention.

For a list of PSA and PSA/DNA services go to www.psacard.com/services.

For additional information, contact PSA Customer Service at 800-325-1121 or by email at info@PSAcard.com.

 

Autograph Alert’s Stephen Koschal Sued for Libel, Deceptive Practices

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Life-size Kobe Bryant Card Sets Guinness World Record

DALLAS, TX (Feb. 13, 2010) – A giant trading card of Los Angeles Lakers All-Star Kobe Bryant unveiled today by Panini America set the Guinness Record for World’s Largest Signed Game-Used Jersey Card. Bryant was at the NBA All-Star Jam Session to autograph the card, which includes a 15-inch-by-15-inch swatch of an official jersey he wore in a game. The card measured 7-feet high by 4-feet ,11-inches wide.

Panini America, (www.paniniamerica.net), a subsidiary of The Panini Group, the leading global publisher of sports and entertainment collectables, is the exclusive trading card partner of the NBA. This week Panini launched Adrenalyn with a national mobile tour that starts in Dallas during All-Star festivities.

Adrenalyn is an interactive trading card game, geared to children ages 6 to 11, that brings together the excitement of the NBA with the thrill of collecting a 450-card set featuring NBA stars Carmelo Anthony, Kobe Bryant, LeBron James, Dirk Nowitzki, Dwyane Wade and NBA rookies Tyreke Evans, Blake Griffin, and Brandon Jennings, among many others.

The front of each Adrenalyn card features an offensive, defensive, and overall rating so kids can play the game using the Adrenalyn game board. The unique authorization code on the back of each card allows kids to upload their cards online to a virtual collector’s album and play the game at www.paniniadrenalyn.com, a safe and secure site. Adrenalyn cards, collector’s kits and starter sets are available at all major retail stores including Wal-Mart, Target, Toys “R” Us, Kmart, and The Dollar Store, and online at NBAStore.com and at the NBA Store in New York City.