Beethoven Letter, Reagan and Magritte Archives, Rare Autograph Letters, in Profiles in History’s April 18th Auction

Beethoven Twice-Signed Autograph Letter

 

Profiles in History has a very interesting historical document auction on Monday, April 18, starting at 11 a.m. PDT. Joe Maddalena and his staff have assembled one of the finest collections of historic documents they’ve ever brought to auction. It’s an extraordinary catalog featuring 197 lots of rare and desirable, fascinating material.

The auction takes place at Profiles in History in Calabassas, Calif. on Monday at 11 a.m PDT. You can bid in person, by phone or online.

A few of their offerings:

The auction features Lincoln, Freud, John Quincy Adams, Mark Twain and other highly sought-after names. Many of the lots have notably desirable content. It’s a catalog you’ll definitely want to view if you’re an historic autograph collector.

A reminder: The auction is this Monday, April 18 at 11 a.m. PDT, so take a look at it now.

Review the catalog on Invaluable.com. You can bid online there, too.

View the printed catalog online at Profiles in History.

Register and view all your options here.

Remarkable Ronald Reagan archive of over 350 photographs (majority unpublished) and 128 letters - 92 autograph letters signed and 35 typed letters signed.

Remarkable Ronald Reagan archive of over 350 photographs (majority unpublished) and 128 letters – 92 autograph letters signed and 35 typed letters signed.

 

An important unpublished archive showcasing the intimate correspondence between René Magritte and his wife, Georgette Berger

An important unpublished archive showcasing the intimate correspondence between René Magritte and his wife, Georgette Berger.

 

You can email Profiles in History about the auction at info@profilesinhistory.com

Or call them at 310-859-7701

RR Auction Sues rrauctionlawsuit.com Owner for Defamation, 14 Other Counts

New Hampshire-based auction house RR Auction filed a lawsuit in Federal Court on Tuesday, June 2, against Michael Johnson, owner of rrauctionlawsuit.com. The complaint charges 15 counts, including business defamation, abusive litigation practices, false light invasion of privacy, interference with contractual relationships, misappropriation of RR Auction’s marks and trade name, breach of implied covenant of good faith and fair dealing, and cybersquatting.

The lawsuit was filed in the U.S. District Court for the District of New Hampshire. Johnson resides in Bakersfield, Calif. RR Auction also has an office in Boston, Mass. The Boston Globe reported the suit on June 3: “Cybersquatting law could be tested in N.H. court case”

Johnson filed a lawsuit in California against RR Auction in 2012, claiming that RR Auction sold him forgeries and refused to honor their guarantee of authenticity. RR Auction claims that even though they believe that the autographs are genuine, they tried to refund Johnson’s money, but he would not return the autographs to them. They claim that Johnson is the first customer to file a lawsuit against them for failing to honor their guarantee in the company’s 39-year history.

RR Auction claims that Johnson registered rrauctionlawsuit.com in 2013, a domain that misappropriated RR Auction’s trade name, and began populating it with misinformation to harm their business in order to force them to settle his lawsuit against them. They say that by registering at least 13 domain names using RR Auction or the personal names of RR employees or owners in the title, Johnson has tried, and been successful, in coopting the attention of clients or potential clients. They claim he referred to his lawsuit as a class action lawsuit, but that despite soliciting 400 RR clients in California to join him in a class action, no one did and the California court wouldn’t certify a class.

Mr. Johnson also posted a scathing document online that he refers to as an “affidavit,” which he claims was written by a former employee, Karen “Kay” Burris. According to court documents, Burris was terminated in 2008 after it was discovered she embezzled what turned out to be $455,000 from RR Auction. Burris committed suicide shortly after RR Auction went to law enforcement with their discovery. The court in California excluded the document, referring to it as “hearsay,” “lack[ing] foundation,” and observing that “the content of it remains speculation.”

Preliminarily, RR Auction says that they will ask the Court shut down Mr. Johnson’s Internet domains that incorporate RR Auction’s mark and trade name and intentionally divert clients and potential clients to “this misinformation.”

Representatives at RR Auction”s law firm, Burns & Levinson LLP, released this statement:

“Rather than post websites riddled with salacious and outrageous accusations, we will let our court filings do the talking.  The law and facts are, we believe, firmly in our favor, and we are hopeful that the Court and any jury that may review this case will agree.

“When a dissatisfied former customer takes it upon himself to turn litigation into a platform to escalate a personal dispute beyond reasonable limits, highly respected companies like RR Auction are not obligated to sit back and take body blows indefinitely.  Too many people”s jobs, too many collectors” faith in the memorabilia industry, and the integrity of the judicial system are at stake.  We look forward to assisting RR Auction in this litigation.”

“We have built this company for almost 40 years with a guarantee, like no other auction house in this industry and we have ALWAYS honored that guarantee,” states RR Auction president Robert Eaton. “We hope that RR Auction’s customers, after months of hearing Mr. Johnson’s account, will pay equal attention to this litigation, and decide for themselves who they can believe: RR Auction, a trusted name in memorabilia auctions, or one man who has litigated three years over a handful of items totaling a few thousand dollars in value – items for which he was offered a full refund but refused.”

Johnson was served with the lawsuit June 3. Autograph will be covering this story on an ongoing basis as Johnson or his attorneys release their statements or file their responses.

Newly Discovered Stone Printing of Declaration of Independence Brings $597,500

[Read more…]

What Whitney Houston’s Last Autographs Reveal

By Kathi McKnight,
Master Certified Expert Handwriting Analyst

Whitney Houston signing her last documented autograph, Thursday, Feb. 9, 2012.

 

Whitney Houston

Raw Talent, Big Presence, Troubled Handwriting

The music world and fans were stunned and saddened by the sudden death on February 11 of Whitney Houston .

Despite tumultuous public battles with addictions and substance abuse, she will be remembered most of all for her legendary, extraordinary voice. But while her voice expressed the heavenly gift deep in her soul, her handwriting reveals the demons she struggled with.

Join me now in taking an exclusive look at what was going on deep inside this beloved Pop Diva’s soul in the final hours of her life, via the insights her very own handwriting reveals.

Whitney Houston February 9, 2012

Two days before her unexpected death, TMZ and paparazzi captured Whitney signing her last two documented autographs. Disheveled looking, she wasn’t the Whitney we were used to seeing.

 

Whitney's Houston's first album, and one of the last two she signed.

Whitney's first album, and one of the last two she signed.

One autograph she signed was on her first album, “Whitney Houston,” a top seller. The cover shows Whitney looking sleek and divine like the goddess of pop music that she was.

But her handwriting…was a mess. You don’t have to be a certified graphologist to see the writing on the wall.

Were there any clues in those final autographs to give a warning that she had just given her last performance? Revealing that for Whitney Houston, the final curtain had just come down?

It had been so many years since Whitney included a smiley face in her autographs, yet on this night, where her final performance was captured at the Tru Nightclub in Hollywood, she signed her autographs with a smiley face superimposed over her signature.

She wanted the world to see her as happy, like in the old days. Tangled and illegible her autograph reveals much more than meets the eye.

Come with me for an insider’s look.
I’ll teach you how to read between the lines.

Our signature, autograph, our John Hancock—whatever you want to call it—is our personal logo. It is the public profile we want the world to see.

While it must be noted that no one can be fully known or analyzed by just their signature alone, and that full handwriting samples are strongly recommended for a full analysis, do not dismiss the power a signature carries.

The signature is just the tip of the iceberg, and what does show up, can carry 3-5 times the weight of importance compared to the rest of one’s handwriting.

Think of it this way:  What if those on the Titanic had paid attention to the tip of the iceberg? Would the fate of those on board have turned out differently?

 

Signatures: When they are legible the writer is willing to let you see him or her. They are interested in communicating.

When the signature is illegible (as many super stars’ are) it means they only will let you in so far to see them. And they don’t really want you to know who they are. You are not invited in past a certain point. It also means they may have found a fast way to sign their name if they have to sign their name a LOT.

Many celebrities and “regular folk” too, sign their name with the first letter much larger than the rest of the writing; especially if they tend to be successful in business. This is commonly known to reveal a writer who has a “healthy ego” and it is generally accepted. Most people realize it takes a strong sense of self to be successful in the world at large.

Keep in mind, there are no mistakes in handwriting.

Handwriting does not lie.

 

There are over 5,000 things that handwriting reveals about the person being analyzed, and only about things that it doesn’t:

  • It does not predict the future.
  • It does not tell the age of the signer.
  • It does not tell the gender.
  • And it does not tell if the signer is right handed or left handed.

(The last one surprises everyone!)

What we look at as a professional graphologist are the upper loops, the lower loops, the size, the pressure, where the t’s are dotted, where the i’s are crossed, if the writing is rounded or pointed, the slant, where it is placed on the page and soooo much more.

Then…we stack all of these things together!

Whitney Houston's last autograph on a 12-inch single.

Looking at Whitney’s final autographs above, if you didn’t see the picture or know it was her name ahead of time, would you be able to read this signature?

No.

Me neither.

I’m a handwriting analyst, not a mind reader.

Do you see the check-mark far above the letter i? That is her i dot and it reveals annoyance and irritation. Yet she is putting on a happy face (or so she thinks) with a very sloppy attempt at superimposing a smiley face. She had been drinking when she autographed these pictures. Even still, she wrote uphill which usually means optimism. She was feeling high and having a good time. Some say when writing is slanted so epically up hill, the writer is trying hard to deny and overcome depression.

Notice the height of the letters in these two autographs. I’m not talking just about the first letter of her name. I’m referring to any and all letter that naturally go into the upper zone, in this case the “h” and “t”. When letters reaching into the upper zone are more than 3 times the height of the middle zone, it is an indicator of vanity.

No big deal you say? After all, if anyone had reason to be vain, it would be Whitney Houston. Gorgeous, rich, beloved, talented beyond reason, all true.

Michael Jackson had the trait of vanity in his autographs and hand-writings too.

In an interview with Oprah Winfrey, Houston shared her feelings about performing with Michael Jackson at his 30th-anniversary special in 2001 saying it opened her eyes, that she saw him as a “mirror” because he reflected her own issues with addictions. “I just remember doing the anniversary special and I remember looking at Michael and I remember looking at myself and I was getting scared looking at him,” she said. “I was looking at myself. I don’t want it to be like this. Mike and I were very close.”

While there are quite a few other factors found in these autographs, look at the height of some of the letters in “Whitney.” They are disproportionately tall compared to the other letters. You could go mountain climbing over those tall letters.

In handwriting analysis when a person unconsciously writes strokes and letters that are disproportionally tall in their height compared to the rest of the writing (specifically compared to the middle zone letters) it is a clear indicator of vanity.

And this seems to be the crux of her demise. It is one of the more unfortunate and potent traits that were setting her up for a fall.

When vanity is discovered in handwriting, it reveals a writer who prefers high achievement to emotional satisfaction. There is arrogance and a dogmatic approach to living life. The writer has intense pride in herself and what she has achieved. But here is the kicker:

Rejection can cause acute anxiety to
the person with vanity in their writing.

This trait of vanity as it is discovered in handwriting means the writer is enslaved to adoration, constant praise and attention. They are the most susceptible to flattery out of all the other traits found in handwriting.

In my new book,  What the Final Autographs of Whitney Houston Reveal: Sizzling Secrets in her Script, I trace Whitney’s handwriting from the early days in the 1980s-90s when her career was at its peak…clear up to the bitter end. Her autographs over the years reveal an autobiography rich in surprises and the pivotal moments are revealed when she could have gone one way or the other.

There was a time when she seemed to have an angel on one shoulder and the Devil on the other.

However the trait of vanity was always present, even in the early days, back in 1990’s, when she autographed this picture. This woman with the voice of an angel was battling many demons.

Whitney Houston back in the 1990s.

You could practically read the autograph back then, but sadly the writing reveals a strong indicator of self doubt as is evidenced by the ending stroke of the letter y moving up, over and to the left as she uses that stroke to cross her letter t. It also serves as a protective bubble over her name. This and more uncovers her feelings of self protectiveness, self doubt and much more.

Pride that accompanies vanity makes it difficult to admit the need for anyone else, even God himself. Pride feeds the illusion that we are completely independent and self-sufficient. Whitney never fully “got” it. “A vital part of overcoming alcohol addiction drug abuse, codependency or baggage from the past that may make you susceptible to a lifestyle of pain and suffering is finding spirituality in recovery (beliefs), or a strength greater than yourself.” “The more faith you put in the spiritual relationship and the more you trust the guidance without using human logic, the greater will be the results in your life.” Spirituality in Addiction Rehabilitation

It’s ironic. The song she sang so passionately held the answers all along.

But a beat was skipped and now the curtain has gone down for the final time.

 

Greatest Love of All

I believe the children are our future
Teach them well and let them lead the way
Show them all the beauty they possess inside
Give them a sense of pride to make it easier
Let the children’s laughter remind us how we used to be

Everybody’s searching for a hero
People need someone to look up to
I never found anyone who fulfilled my needs
A lonely place to be
So I learned to depend on me

[Chorus:]
I decided long ago, never to walk in anyone’s shadows
If I fail, if I succeed
At least I’ll live as I believe
No matter what they take from me
They can’t take away my dignity
Because the greatest love of all
Is happening to me
I found the greatest love of all
Inside of me
The greatest love of all
Is easy to achieve
Learning to love yourself
It is the greatest love of all

I believe the children are our future
Teach them well and let them lead the way
Show them all the beauty they possess inside
Give them a sense of pride to make it easier

Let the children’s laughter remind us how we used to be

[Chorus]

And if, by chance, that special place
That you’ve been dreaming of
Leads you to a lonely place
Find your strength in love

___________________________________________________

RIP

Whitney Houston

Kathi McKnight is a master certified expert handwriting analyst, motivational speaker and author. For more information and to sign up for free weekly tips about 7 Little Known Handwriting Analysis Secrets, visit her website at TheHandwritingExpert.com  or KathiMcKnight.com.

Watch for Kathi’s new book, “What Whitney Houston’s Final Autographs Reveal: The Sizzling Secrets in her Script” to get an exclusive look at her autographs with in-depth analyses of each and every one. Bonus: “Handwriting samples of Michael Jackson”, and many more. Available at Amazon and Barnes and Noble by March 15 or sooner!

PSA and PSA/DNA Opening New Jersey Office

(Woodbridge, New Jersey) — To meet the increasing needs of collectors and dealers in the eastern U.S., especially in autographs, Professional Sports Authenticator and PSA/DNA Authentication Services are opening an office in Woodbridge, N.J., this summer.

Only in-person submissions will be accepted at the new office, by appointment. All mailed and shipped submissions should still be sent to PSA and PSA/DNA’s Calif. office unless pre-approved by the staff.

“We’re very excited about the New Jersey office,” said Joe Orlando, President of PSA and PSA/DNA. “It is near I-95 and centrally located between New York City and Philadelphia. Considering the concentrated customer base on the upper east coast, and the growing popularity of PSA/DNA-certified autographs, the time is right to provide an additional location for our customers.”

Orlando said the new office will improve turnaround times on many submissions.

“We’ve had three consecutive record quarters for PSA/DNA, and some members of our staff have been traveling over 100,000 miles each year to service our customers. A few of our California employees will be relocating to the New Jersey office, and we’ll be hiring additional employees. By being able to process autographs on both coasts more efficiently, our turnaround times will naturally improve.”
Only autographs will be processed in New Jersey, but, the new office will accept all other submissions, including trading cards, tickets, photographs, sports memorabilia and game-used items for evaluation by PSA and PSA/DNA authenticators and graders in California and elsewhere.

“We’ll be able to encapsulate authenticated items in the New Jersey office, such as autographed cuts and autographed cards,” Orlando said. “It also will be easier and more convenient for eastern U.S. collectors and dealers to submit larger items, such as autographed bats and helmets, without mailing them.”

The New Jersey office will host open submission days, similar to PSA Fridays in Calif., where the public can personally submit items and meet PSA and PSA/DNA staff members.

“People have been asking me for several years, ‘When are you going to open an east coast office?'” Orlando said. “The answer is this summer, and we’ll have additional information about it in the weeks ahead with a formal announcement at the National Sports Collectibles Convention.

For a list of PSA and PSA/DNA services go to www.psacard.com/services.

For additional information, contact PSA Customer Service at 800-325-1121 or by email at info@PSAcard.com.